Wed September 26, 2018
Advertisement
Can't connect right now! retry

add The News to homescreen

tap to bring up your browser menu and select 'Add to homescreen' to pin the The News web app

Got it!

add The News to homescreen

tap to bring up your browser menu and select 'Add to homescreen' to pin the The News web app

Got it!
Must Read

Editorial

March 11, 2018

Share

Advertisement

Transgender rights

The project begun in 2009 by the Supreme Court of granting transgender citizens their basic rights was taken forward by the Senate on Wednesday when it approved a bill to protect their rights and enable them to determine their gender identity. If it becomes a law, the Transgender Persons Bill 2017, after approval by the National Assembly, will allow transgender persons to register themselves under their perceived gender identity at government offices rather than have it determined by a medical board. The bill is intended to protect the transgender community from harassment and mistreatment. For example, it permits them to obtain driving licences and prohibits discrimination at health facilities, in educational institutions, or in public transport. While transgender persons were granted the right to obtain CNICs in 2009, and a passport was issued for transgender persons for the first time last year, problems for the community have continued. Many have reported difficulties in finding employment while last year in Peshawar a transgender activist is reported to have died at a major hospital because staff on duty were reluctant to treat her. The new bill is intended to prevent such action.

It should be noted that the transgender community in the country places its own number at over half a million while in the national census computed last year only 10,000 transgender persons were identified. Those working towards transgender rights argue that this is a result of discrimination. In the Senate, law makers backing the bill have hoped it will allow transgender people to have the same life, work, sport and entertainment as all other Pakistanis. The bill came days after the KP government issued driving licences to transgender persons for the first time. While the Senate bill helps draw attention to the situation of transgender people in the country, it is also clear new laws will need to be backed by wider measures to end the harassment and discrimination they face. The media and other forums would need to play a part in this. While rights for the transgender community have been increasingly recognised after the 2009 SC verdict, problems persist in day-to-day life. Laws such as the one now passed by the Senate could help alter this and give the community a chance to live as equal citizens.

Advertisement

Comments

Advertisement
Advertisement

Topstory

Opinion

Newspost

Editorial

National

World

Sports

Business

Karachi

Lahore

Islamabad

Peshawar